The Latest: Lam says she has no plans to resign over unrest

Protesters with protective gear take a train to the anti-extradition bill protest destination, in Hong Kong on Sunday, Aug. 4, 2019. Demonstrators in Hong Kong moved en masse to a luxury shopping district Sunday evening after riot police used tear gas to clear out an area they were previously occupying, as the 2-month-old protest movement showed no signs of easing. (AP Photo/Kin Cheung)

Hong Kong leader Carrie Lam says she has no plans to resign over the civil unrest targeting her administration

HONG KONG — The Latest on the protests in Hong Kong (all times local):

11 a.m.

Hong Kong leader Carrie Lam says she has no plans to resign over the civil unrest targeting her administration.

Lam said she took responsibility for problems as chief executive and was determined to see the situation resolved.

She spoke at a news conference Monday as protesters blocked morning trains and called for a citywide strike. More than 100 flights were canceled.

Lam said the latest protests had moved from extradition legislation, which her administration had shelved, and now were operating with "ulterior motives" targeting Hong Kong's prosperity and security.

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10:30 a.m.

Hong Kong leader Carrie Lam says recent protests have pushed the city to the "verge of a very dangerous situation" but the government will be resolute in ensuring public order.

A tired looking Lam delivered the remarks at a news conference Monday morning that follows weeks of daily marches and demonstrations that have frequently devolved into violent confrontations, with police deploying tear gas rubber bullets and other crowd control measures.

Lam said the violence and disruptions were creating anxiety among citizens and now was the time to set aside differences and "rally together."

Protesters were blocking trains during the morning rush hour and called for a citywide strike by workers. More than 100 flights were cancelled at the city's airport, and Hong Kong media say that the airport express train service has been suspended.

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9:45 a.m.

Hong Kong's leader will speak to the media as protesters block morning trains and call for a citywide strike by workers.

The office of Chief Executive Carrie Lam said she would hold a news conference at 10 a.m. Monday.

The strike has already taken hold at the airport, where 100 flights have been cancelled. Hong Kong media say that the airport express train service has been suspended.

Protesters used a now-familiar tactic of blocking train doors from closing to disrupt the morning commute.

The actions follow a weekend of clashes between protesters and police. The protesters are demanding the dissolution of the legislature, an investigation into police use of force at protests and full democracy for the semi-autonomous Chinese territory.

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9:30 a.m.

Hong Kong media say more than 100 flights have been cancelled at the city's airport as a general strike called to support pro-democracy protests gets underway.

Public broadcaster RTHK said Monday that domestic carriers such as Cathay Pacific and Hong Kong Airlines were the most affected.

A citywide strike and demonstrations in seven districts in Hong Kong have been called for Monday afternoon. They follow a weekend of clashes with police on the streets.

Hong Kong has seen protests all summer. A movement against an extradition bill that would have allowed residents to be sent to mainland China to stand trial has expanded into demands for an investigation into alleged police abuse at protests and the dissolution of the legislature.

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9: 10 a.m.

Protesters in Hong Kong have snarled the morning rush hour by blocking train and platform doors to prevent trains from leaving stations.

Subway and train operator MTR said Monday that service had been partially suspended on four lines because of a number of door obstruction incidents.

It's the third time in three weeks that protesters have disrupted train service. The action followed a weekend of clashes with police on the streets and ahead of a general strike and more demonstrations called for Monday afternoon.

Hong Kong has seen protests all summer. A movement against an extradition bill that would have allowed residents to be sent to mainland China to stand trial has expanded into demands for an investigation into alleged police abuse at protests and the dissolution of the legislature.

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