Giving up gas: China's Shenzhen switches to electric taxis

In this Monday, Jan. 7, 2019, photo, a new electric-powered taxi, right, and a gasoline-powered taxi are seen in Shenzhen city, south China's Guangdong province. One of China's major cities has reached an environmental milestone, an almost all electric-powered taxi fleet. The high-tech hub of Shenzhen in southern China announced at the start of this year that 99 percent of the 21,689 taxis operating in the city were electric. (AP Photo/Vincent Yu)

One of China's major cities has reached an environmental milestone: an almost all electric-powered taxi fleet

SHENZHEN, China — One of China's major cities has reached an environmental milestone: an almost entirely electric-powered taxi fleet.

The high-tech hub of Shenzhen in southern China announced at the start of this year that 99 percent of the 21,689 taxis operating in the city were electric. Last year, it still had 7,500 gasoline-powered taxis on the roads. A few can still be found, but electric ones far outnumber them.

The metropolis of 12.5 million is the second to achieve this feat in China and the largest. The northern China city of Taiyuan, with a population of 4.3 million, has had only electric taxis since 2016.

Shenzhen "has taken the lead among major Chinese cities," said Cui Dongshu, the secretary-general of the China Passenger Car Association.

Shenzhen's bus fleet has been all-electric since 2017. It's one of 13 pilot cities promoting alternative-energy public transport to cut smog and develop the alternative energy industry, the Shenzhen Municipality Transport Committee said.

Beijing and other Chinese cities are served by legions of electric scooters, bicycles and three-wheeled delivery vehicles that help reduce emissions — and sometimes startle pedestrians with their near-silent operation.

Shenzhen's 20,000-plus electric taxis will reduce carbon emissions by about 850,000 tons a year, the city's transport committee said. However, the all-electric initiative doesn't include Uber-like ride-hailing and ride-sharing services, which are popular in China.

Providing places to recharge taxis has been a big hurdle since Shenzhen rolled out its first 100 electric cabs in 2010. Cui praised the city for its network of about 20,000 public charging stations, which he said should be enough to meet most of the demand.

The electric taxis are equipped with an on-board terminal that tells drivers where taxis are in short supply, such as the airport, train station or other locations. It also clearly displays the fare and the taxi's route, which the Shenzhen transport committee said would help prevent drivers from overcharging or taking a roundabout route.

Shenzhen, which borders Hong Kong, is home to Huawei Technologies and a host of other Chinese technology companies.

___

Associated Press researchers Chen Si in Shanghai and Yu Bing in Beijing contributed to this report.

Related News

Merkel appeals to Russia to enable Syria...

Sep 5, 2016

German Chancellor Angela Merkel is renewing an appeal to Russia to enable a cease-fire in Syria and...

May says Britain still inspires confidence...

Sep 5, 2016

After meeting with other world leaders during the G-20 summit, British Prime Minister Theresa May...

Asian stocks drift as Fed rate outlook eases on...

Sep 7, 2016

Asian stocks meandered Wednesday after a weak report on U.S. service companies reinforced...

Asian stocks mixed on stronger China trade,...

Sep 8, 2016

Asian stock markets were mixed Thursday after China reported unexpectedly strong trade and Wall...

China imports grow in August for 1st time in 2...

Sep 8, 2016

China trade showed unexpected strength in August in a positive sign for global economic growth

China's electric vehicle industry shaken by...

Sep 13, 2016

China's electric vehicle industry, a flagship for Beijing's technology ambitions, has been rocked...

About Us

Daily World Web took the initiative to utilize the development in cloud and AI technology to create a free, instantaneous and borderless flow of news, the way it should be.

Contact us: sales[at]dailyworldweb.com

Subscribe Now!